Press for Live Gig in Falmouth

Aardvark Records, which launched in 2001 with the new model of music business, now used by most independents, has signed Scott Lloyd who lives in Manchester and will be launching his first single Looking Out To Sea on 22nd June in Falmouth.

What’s On in Falmouth Packet on 30 May 2018

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Press publicity for Chris Purchase DVD recording

Thank you to the West Briton and Falmouth Packet for including the comedy night in their What’s On pages.

Falmouth Packet

West Briton

In Falmouth Packet What’s on section

 

In West Briton’s pick of the month

Local PR Services – art, comedy, social and music events in Cornwall

Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 14.03.30Thank you to the Falmouth Packet and West Briton for publishing these releases:

Jason Viney’s Diorama = West Briton

Mustard and Rye Falmouth Packet

Mustard and Rye – West Briton

Mustard and Rye – Falmouth Packet

Comedy Jam at Toast – West Briton

Comedy Jam at Toast – Falmouth Packet

Wild Zellas Falmouth PacketComedy Jam at Toast – West Briton

The Wild Zellas – Falmouth Packet

SourceFM Social – Falmouth Packet

Comedy in Cornwall – Falmouth Packet

SourceFM Social – Falmouth Packet

Mustard and Rye – Falmouth Packet

West-Briton-Comedy-nights-April-

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Press for artists and events in Cornwall – comedy and music

12931050_10153434047366850_7424844583345284407_nThank you to the Falmouth Packet and West Briton for publishing these releases:

Mustard and Rye Falmouth Packet

Mustard and Rye – West Briton

Mustard and Rye – Falmouth Packet

Comedy Jam at Toast – West Briton

Comedy Jam at Toast – Falmouth Packet

Wild Zellas Falmouth PacketComedy Jam at Toast – West Briton

The Wild Zellas – Falmouth Packet

West-Briton-Comedy-nights-April-

Man who Claims Unfair Discrimination Damages Disability Awareness

This article was triggered by the report in the Western Morning News as of today (16 July 2015) as I believed the statements made in it are inaccurate.

Breaking: I just received a reply from the WMN’s senior reporter to say:

“Sorry for the late response. We are going to look again at the story anyway and in the meantime have removed it from the website. I’ll let you know if we’re going to take it forward, although do get in touch if anything else happens.”

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 18.37.02I went yesterday to the Cutty Sark to interview witnesses, bar staff and the landlady to find out what happened on the night in question. Up until Tuesday night, the sequence of events were on Alex’s Facebook page and they do not reflect what he says happened. For instance, two separate press accounts say he went home or back to his hotel after the incident feeling humiliated, whereas his Facebook post confirmed he went to Five Degrees West next door for a pint.

After asking around and a visit from the Falmouth Packet, the landlady sent her statement to the BBC, who were due to interview Alex on TV at 9.15am on 16 July.  After acknowledging receipt of my email, Sarah then replied:

“Thank you so much for the below.

Just to let you know we are now not doing the interview tomorrow morning but thank you for your help anyway.”

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 18.31.30I have just received this information:

However, Steve Taylor, PR and communications manager of Changing Faces, who are launching a nationwide awareness campaign, says Alex was on a boat ride on Friday 11 July and doesn’t like Stella. Further investigation underway amongst boat trip providers and retailers.

The landlady made the decision to tell the bar staff not to serve Alex when she saw someone stumble into the pub, without seeing who it was. Jess and Al

He was told by bar staff he wouldn’t be served and said nothing and left.

This is where I am coming from

Because I am hard of hearing, before I had hearing aids, I would frequently be turned away from places because they considered me to be too drunk, and I explained qhy I had slurred speech. This didn’t change anything due to licensing laws (they couldn’t give me the benefit of the doubt) and it stopped happening when I got hearing aids. One night in a pub in Falmouth, I used the ‘hard of hearing’ card after a few drinks, when I was refused service and called the next day to apologise, as I was pissed.

Landlord's have liability for all their patrons under Section 141 of the annually updated Licensing Act.
Landlord’s have liability for all their patrons under Section 141 of the annually updated Licensing Act.

Ironically, in March 2013, I was banned, because I fell down the stairs on my way out of Five Degrees Below (owned by establishment where Alex went for pint after being refused at the Cutty) and over a year later in 2014, I was denied entry upstairs although I had been into the main bar on occasions since the ‘ban’. I went in after the originating incident to show staff my Dyspraxia report which confirms that I had bad motor skills and could fall over easily.  We all need to be aware of our limitations, whatever they are and however they effect us.

Back to the Cutty

The landlady saw someone stumble and told the bar staff not to serve them. The bar staff said that Alex’s breath smelt strongly of beer when he leaned over the bar to make his order, which is when he was told he had had enough. He left without saying much more than ‘OK’. I would question if his reaction at this point is consistent with how he said he felt to the press.

Bar staff gain experience in knowing if someone has already had too much before arriving. Who is to know what Alex had on a day out on his own in Falmouth before 9.30pm.
Bar staff gain experience in knowing if someone has already had too much before arriving. Who is to know what Alex had on a day out on his own in Falmouth before 9.30pm.

On the next day he went back and caused a scene, raised his voice to the landlady who had not ignored him to watch the tennis (as first reported) but went to speak to him although it was her day off. Two patrons who witnessed this scene have given interviews. Not getting an outright apology that he wanted, he stomped off, slamming the door behind him.

This is all on CCTV which can only be released if something illegal happened.

In media law this could be ‘Defamation’ as the facts given in the press have not been checked and this is detrimental to business income and professional reputation. There has been no fact checking by the press and Alex’s version of events has only been reported, even after the landlady gave her version of events, and Alex has covered his tracks and changed his story.  An article just removed for further investigation had added: ‘who walks with an uneven gait due a foot condition’ to perhaps explain him stumbling into the pub.

There is also a contradiction between these two statements.

– Alex claims he was “mortified to be ordered to leave by the landlady who said he had already had too much to drink.”- Then he says: “I was so shocked and I just decided to beat an exit.”
Patrons from all social groups, including those with hidden disabilities, show their support for the bar and its staff.
Patrons from all social groups, including those with hidden disabilities, show their support for the bar and its staff

Therefore, he was not ordered to leave. He was told he had had enough and said OK and left, without challenging the decision. As his breath smelt of beer, it appears he had had more than ‘less than a pint’ to drink.

Had this not happened to him before? Is this because he is well known for using his disability so no one dares not serve him a drink?  On his Twitter feed today, he publishes a lunchtime tipple. On a full day out on his own in Falmouth, revisiting where he did his degree, did Alex only have a 500ml bottle of beer before 9.30pm when he went to the Cutty?

I myself wrote for a careers magazine for disabled graduates called the Arberry Profile, guided blind people on holidays for Vitalise, work as an access steward for Attitude Is Everything at major festivals and worked as a guide for Deafblind UK for two years. I have not met many people who would want to be such victims of their disabilities, especially when something has nothing to do with a disability.

Here are some articles on disability issues I have written, linked from my website, plus a link to the page with articles on hearing loss and Deafness issues.

I do not believe this story is doing any good to raise disability awareness or helping to create a more inclusive society. It could be reinforcing ingrained views that disabled people are victims of their disabilities, rather than able to adapt and create awareness around them and ask for reasonable adjustments, as other patrons at the Cutty do, including Simon Carr who, yesterday, said this on his Facebook page :

As an old building, going in there is a sign for people to mind the step.
On the way in there is a sign for people to mind the step.

“So, today we have learn’t about the power of social media, or more exactly, how people get all irate without checking ANY facts, knowing the situation, OR being reasonable, eh, Jess, I have been fighting hard!!!!!”  – Simon Carr.

In his BBC interview Alex said ‘I had less than five…less than a pint’. The decision not to serve him was based on the belief he had already had drinks, making it illegal to serve him under section 141 of the Licensing Act and at the time, he did not say anything and left to go to another pub.

Peter from the Falmouth Packet went to the Cutty to do his own investigation and this is their more balanced article of 15 July.

I will be broadcasting interviews with the landlady, two witnesses who saw Alex come back on the Sunday and the bar person on my radio show tomorrow on www.thesourcefm.co.uk/listen from 2-3.30pm (Friday 17 July).

Then on Friday 24 July, I will be speaking to Steve Taylor or James Partridge of Changing Faces, about their awareness campaign which they have confirmed will not mention the Cutty and feedback on how to handle the situation better has been handed back to Alex.

Publicity for comedy: Glen Maney comes to Falmouth

glen new 7Thanks to the Falmouth Packet for including this piece on Glen Maney’s Edinburgh preview of The Prostate Years. Here is a wider selection of press I have done to promote comedy Also thanks to What’s On Cornwall

Plus the West Briton.

Exhibition Review

Photo by Lauren Watts (c) 2012. Martin Howse and his 'psychogeophysical' walker
Photo by Lauren Watts (c) 2012. Martin Howse and his ‘psychogeophysical’ walker

Here is a review I wrote about a contemporary art show.

Martin Howse – September 2012

In September, 2012, performance and experimental artist Martin Howse – previously found in action at places such as the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London cooking up his creative work set to music with his contemporaries – chose Falmouth for his first solo show Execution.

Here is my review of this interesting and strange show, which incorporated itself beautifully into the Fish Factory’s exhibition space, with help from in-house and the artist’s own craftsmanship.

The review can be found alongside many other recent shows which have been held in Cornwall on the ArtCornwall.org website. Martin Howse Execution.

Enjoying the Performing Arts in Falmouth

Comedians in Falmouth

Since I moved to Falmouth in 2011, I’ve seen two of favourite comedians perform within walking distance of where I live. One, Mark Steel, was at the Pavillion and the other, Josie Long, was at the Poly.

Thanks for the pose, Josie.
Thanks for the pose, Josie.

In a year I’ve also seen Henning Wehn, who was fabulous, Robin Ince, Seann Walsh (not my cuppa) and Jo Caulfield (laughed throughout). At the Pavillion, I also saw Simon Day from the Fast Show who seemed ill-advised in his performance of a reading from his autobiography for £14 a head.

It’s not just comedians but local theatre companies too. Owdyado Theatre toured Wrong-doings and Wake Up Calls at the Stop-Off Motel, which I saw at the Poly. Last night I saw Near-Ta Theatre’s Christmas Time in which two guys in jail get themselves worked up into Christmas excitement which climaxes with their own nativity musical.

Here’s a link to my review of Josie Long at the Poly in the local paper.

Two Stories of Misidentity of Hearing Aids and Nuts – Part 2

This evening.

I am rushing to get the bus to see a talk. I can’t find my hearing aid.

The chance to get the bus comes and goes and while searching for missing hearing aid, I find the batteries for my back up.

After midnight, I return from a night of painting Falmouth a light shade of red and see the bag of nuts I had moved to my side table.

I remember, without my glasses on, picking up nuts from my bedside table – where I put my hearing aid at night – after the bag had spilled out the night before. I remember the feel of a large nut that I guessed was a Brazil.

Seeing the bag of nuts that I had folded up on the side table, I have an idea. I look inside and lo and behold, my hearing aid is in there.

Buying local fresh food is the best

As I was brought up in the countryside in the 1970s, I have appreciated fresh local produce ever since. My parents kept chickens and had a vegetable patch and various fruit trees in the garden.

Just before Perranarworthal on the A39 out of Penryn.

The delicate aroma of homegrown potatoes will never leave my memory, even though I’ve not smelt many potatoes like those that grew in my kitchen garden since.  I remember having unpasteurized milk when my mother dropped a school-friend home to her parents’ dairy farm.

Yarg

On the way home for Christmas, last year, I stopped at a fruit and veg stall just before Perranarworthal. That was my first introduction to Yarg. Wrapped in wild garlic leaves, this white Cornish cheese is sold as a mini-Yarg – despite the word ‘mini’ a decent amount of cheese, it lasted my family the whole of Christmas last year – for £4.95 and that is the best price. This cheese comes straight from the producers. There are plain ones for people who don’t like garlic.

Every time I visit this farm shop I go home inspired to write a blog. Another speciality is the meat. The owner, Juliet Purley, has a pig farm and sells food for other farmers as well. The venison is especially good and at very reasonable prices. I got venison steaks, sausages and burgers. Apparently venison is a low fat meat, I didn’t know this, so some pork has to be added to gel the sausages and burgers together.

Once I’ve had one of their pork or venison sausages, I don’t think I could have a normal Richmond or supermarket own brand sausage again. The meat quantity rather than fat is 80% and they proved themselves to be low fat by giving off no fat in my roasting dish.

OK, the bananas are not locally produced.

Prices

Behind the counter there are three or four stacks of eggs. These come in small, medium, large or extra large and are not only very fresh (sometimes warm with chicken feathers still attached) they are cheaper than eggs laid by battery hens in the supermarket. I enjoy taking back an empty egg box and saying ‘fill ‘er up please.’ You’re saving on packaging for one thing.

Carbon Footprint

Why not eat healthily, save money, reduce packaging and your carbon footprint? Sounds too earnest and worthy for some people? Out of season fruit and vegetables are sold, apparently to meet demand. Juliet tells me that some people just shop there at Christmas.

What is it about Christmas that makes people treat themselves to proper food instead of bribing the supermarkets to keep hoodwinking us. OK, supermarket are great for some things, but not fruit, veg,

Fresh eggs are easily to cook ‘home schooled’ in water with a drop of white vinegar.

dairy, fish or meat, I’d say. Especially not in Cornwall with so many different producers around.

Shopping bags

I came away with two bags laden with food. When I do a supermarket shop and have that much stuff, I notice two differences:

1 I’ve bought the kind of stuff I put in a cupboard and don’t use for ages.

2. I’ve bought too much of some things and they’ll disappear into the freezer.

They say a full English Breakfast is what we’re known for, so feast your eyes on this.